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Joomla ACL: Configuring back-end ACL

Written by | Tuesday, 01 May 2012 00:00 | Published in 2012 May
How to set up a better user experience for your clients — while enhancing usability — by using ACL on the back end of Joomla

Translations available

Thank you, Helvecio da Silva, for translating this article to Portuguese: Joomla: configurando ACL no back-end

Thank you, Iván Ramos, for translating this article to Spanish: Joomla ACL: Configurando el ACL del backend

Thank you, Claudio Driussi, for translating this article to Italian: migliorare l'esperienza utente aumentando l'usabilità utilizzando ACL nel back-end di Joomla

Thank you, Lo-Jen Chi, for translating this article to Traditional Chinese: Joomla存取控制列表:設定後台的存取控制列表

Thank you, Katerina Vorobyova, for translating this article to Russian: http://joomlablog.ru/uroki-joomla/284-joomla-acl-nastrojka-paneli-administratora

Please feel free to translate this article to other languages. Include a link to this article, and I will link back to you! Let me know your translation is posted via Twitter (@jen4web) or through my website (jenkramer.org).

Introduction

In previous articles, I've covered ACL terminology and a general overview of how ACL works, setting up front-end access levels, and creating a better user experience at login. Now I will cover how to set up a better user experience for your clients — while enhancing usability — by using ACL on the back end of Joomla.

For most sites I've built, I try to set clients up to edit their website from the front end of Joomla. Unfortunately, Joomla's front-end editing capabilities are limited. It's not possible to easily create new articles or link them to the front end of the website, for example, without setting up blog functionality (and sometimes that's not what you want to use). Therefore, more often than I'd like, I must give my client access to the back end of Joomla to complete simple tasks.

However, when a client arrives at Joomla's back end, they quickly get distracted by functionality they shouldn't ever touch. Even if you give your client Manager access to the back end, they still have distracting options to consider.

By stripping back functionality in Joomla's back end to include only what your client must access, you make the process simpler and easier for your client. They will know what each option is within the menu structure, and they will know how to use them... if you provide proper training and documentation.

Deny until Allow vs. Allow until Deny

Joomla's ACL is configured as a "deny until allow" system. The Public user group has no permission to do anything except view the front end of the website. Each of the default user groups have permissions added, and those permissions are always to Allow something.

Remember that Deny cannot be overridden. If you deny a user group the ability to edit content within a category, you can't override that for just one article within that category. However, if the user group has inherited the "Not Set" permission from Public (meaning they're not allowed to do something but that something can be overridden), they're currently unable to edit articles within a category. You could then give the Allow permission for a single article and override the category setting.

We can add permissions for a user group to perform a certain task at several levels. Let's consider adding the Edit permission, so that our client can edit articles. There are several places where the Edit permission could be added, with associated meanings.

  • Edit, Global Configuration: Many of Joomla's default user groups have the Edit permission assigned in Global Configuration. However, when the Edit permission is assigned here, it means the user group has permission to edit any kind of content: articles, but also weblinks, contact forms, and more. In order to disable ability to edit, you must use Deny. That might mean that you'll need to Deny the ability to edit in many places in Joomla's structure. In general, I don't recommend allowing Edit at the Global Configuration level.
  • Edit, Article Options: Adding the Edit permission here means the client can edit articles and categories anywhere within content. You would need to Deny access to specific categories or articles if the client was not allowed to edit. Remember that Deny cannot be overridden. Unless your client needs to edit everywhere within the Article and Category managers, I would not recommend setting Edit here either.
  • Edit, individual category: The client will now be able to edit articles within a given category. This makes the most sense and is easiest to administer. You can Deny editing in individual articles and not have to worry about what happens if you need to override something deeper in Joomla's structure later.
  • Edit individual articles: You can set permissions on individual articles, but it's time-consuming. In general, I don't recommend changing permissions on articles unless it's absolutely necessary because there's no other solution. Remember that if Deny is set at the category level, it cannot be overridden at the article level.

In general, you want to follow a Deny until Allow strategy when configuring Joomla's ACL. This will allow maximum flexibility for you later, to adjust permissions on an article-by-article basis. If you Allow until Deny, you will not have the flexibility to change permissions later.

The problem we're trying to solve

Let's assume you want to give your client some very basic access to the back end of Joomla:

  • Ability to create, edit, and publish/unpublish articles within a certain category or categories (or all categories)
  • Ability to create, edit, and publish/unpublish menu items
  • Ability to access some basic components like the web links component

Solution overview

The general approach to configuration will be as follows:

  1. Create a new user group, assign core permissions, and create a user for the client.
  2. Assign the appropriate access level(s).
  3. Assign permissions so that the client can access the Article Manager, Menu Manager, and Weblinks.

I recommend you follow along with this example using two web browsers. I use Firefox for my super user login, and I use Chrome for my client login, but you can use any combination of browsers that Joomla supports. This way I can flip between views, adjusting information as I go. If you use one browser, you will need to log out and log in to see the different views — Joomla will not allow you to have two logins shared from one browser.

1. Creating a new user group, assign core permissions, create a user

I have covered this process in detail in other articles. Briefly, do the following:

  • Create a new user group called Client User Group. Make this a child of Public.
  • In Global Configuration, under Permissions, set the Admin Login permission to Allowed. (If your client must also log in on the front end, you may need to set the Site Login permission to allowed. Adjust other permissions accordingly, depending on what your client needs to do.)
  • Create a client user, and assign this user to the Client User Group. Make sure you remember the username and password!

2. Assign access levels

If you log into Joomla as a client at this point, you will see a screen similar to this:

This is not terribly helpful! You were able to log in, but where's the menu? Where's the control panel? What can you do here, other than log out?

One thing you have not yet configured is an access level for the back end of the website. Remember that access levels control who sees what, including modules, content, and so forth. Menus are a module, even on the back end of Joomla. They're an administrator module, and these administrator modules are assigned an access level of Special. Therefore, your client will also need to have the Special access level assigned to their user group.

Because Special is required for making back end ACL work, I advise you not use Special as an access level in the front end of Joomla.

Now do the following:

  • As a super user, assign the Special access level to the Client User Group. (See this article if you need help.)
  • Log out as the client, and then log in again. (Because of the access level change, you will need to log out and log in again to see a changed administrator interface.)

You should see something like this now, as the client:

Here is what the client can do on the back end at this point:

  • Edit their own user profile, including changing username and password for themselves (but because they are not a super user, they will not be able to change their user group(s)).
  • View links to Help, all of which are publicly available web pages.
  • Log out, or view the front end of the website.
  • View a list of the top 5 most popular articles and the last 5 added articles via the modules on the right, but they cannot edit any of those articles.

It's still not terribly useful, but at least it's not absolutely nothing anymore! Our next step is to give the client permission to create, edit, and change state with articles.

3a. Assign permissions: Articles

The client should be able to access the Article Manager on the back end of Joomla. The first step is having the client have the Article Manager as an option in the menu. Once the option is visible, we can then focus on assigning more specific permissions.

Getting the Article Manager to appear in the client back end

To get the Article Manager to appear as an option in the menu, go to Content - Article Manager - Options, choose the Permissions tab, and set "Access Administration Interface" to Allowed for the Client User Group. Click Save in the upper right hand corner.

(You might be curious about the Configure option. This is the permission which allows you to access the Options dialog box. In general, you'll only want super users to have access to this.)

Now go to the client web browser, refresh your screen, and you should see the Article Manager and the Category Manager appear as icons in the control panel as well as in the top menu.

Unfortunately, it is NOT possible to separate permissions for the Article Manager and the Category Manager at this time. This is a major weakness in Joomla's ACL.

If you look at the Article Manager as the client, you will be able to see a full listing of all articles. However, you cannot edit any of them, nor can you change their state. There is no button to create a new article in the upper right — there is only an icon for help.

Editing all articles vs. editing categories of articles

The next step is to give the client permission to edit and change state with these articles. Do you want to give the client the ability to change all articles this way, or do you want to give permission in specific categories, or do you need to give permission on an article-by-article basis?

The answer is always It Depends! When configuring your category structure for the site, I recommend the following:

  • Keep ACL in mind when setting up categories of content. If you need to lock your client out of some of the pages of the site, you might put all of those pages in the same category, even if their content is very different. This will make ACL easier to configure.
  • Likewise, if the client will only edit a certain subset of articles, it might make sense to put them all in the same category.
  • Changing permissions on an article-by-article basis should be saved only for the most rare cases. It's hard to teach your client to configure permissions on new articles. Set the permissions on the category, and the client will never need to touch them as they create new articles.

For each scenario, here's how you might proceed.

The client should edit all articles

If the client should edit all articles, configure permissions as follows:

  • Under Content - Article Manager - Options - Permissions, for the Client User Group, set Create, Edit, Edit State, and Edit Own to Allowed. In general, I do not give clients permission to delete content, as this means they would be able to empty the trashcan. They can unpublish or trash any article with the Edit State permission.

The client should edit articles within a category or categories

If the client will only edit articles within one category or a small number of categories, configure each category as follows:

  • You will still need to allow Access Administrator Interface under Content - Article Manager - Options - Permissions.
  • Under Content - Category Manager, click the category name of the category of articles where the client will be editing. At the bottom of the configuration screen for each category is a set of permissions. Set those permissions to allow Create, Edit, Edit State, and Edit Own.
  • Repeat this process for each category of articles where the client will need access.

The client needs access on an article-by-article basis

You can also edit an individual article as a super user, scroll to the bottom of the screen, and set permissions for the client there. This should only be used in the rarest circumstance. Configuring permissions at the category level is a better approach from a maintenance perspective.

I've allowed my client to create, edit, and change state for any article within the website. The control panel for the client's Joomla control panel now looks like this:

3b. Assign permissions: Media Manager

As the client, if you edit any of the articles, one of the tasks you'll certainly need to accomplish is the ability to add an image to the article.

The way permissions are currently assigned, the client is able to get to the articles, choose one to edit by clicking on the title to get to the editing screen, then click the Image button at the bottom of the article editing window. They pull up the Media Manager screen that looks like this:

Note the client is able to browse for any image that's already in the Media Manager, but there is no interface for uploading a new image to the site. That's because the Media Manager is a separate component from the Article Manager, and because of that, it has its own set of permissions. What's more, the Media Manager does not appear in the menu structure for the back end of Joomla when logged in as the client.

To change this, flip to your super user login, go to Content - Media Manager - Options - Permissions, set Access Administration Interface and Create to Allow.

3c. Assign permissions: Menu

By now, you should have a pretty good idea of what comes next. If the client needs to link articles to the menu, they'll need access to the Menus menu item in the back end of Joomla.

As a super user, go to Menus - Menu Manager - Options - Permissions, and for the Client User Group, set Access Administration Interface, Create, Edit, and Edit State to Allow.

Unfortunately, you are not able to allow the client to add menu items as children of a given menu item only, or allow them to create only specific types of menu items. That would be a great addition to Joomla's ACL.

3d. Assign permissions: Weblinks component

Here's the way my client back end looks now:

Now I want to give the client access to Weblinks, but to no other components within Joomla. Fortunately, that's easy to do, and you can probably guess how to do this at this point.

As a super user, go to Components - Weblinks - Options - Permissions, and for the Client User Group, set Access Administration Interface, Create, Edit, Edit State, and Edit Own to Allow.

You can repeat this process for any of Joomla's core components for which you'd like the client to have access.

Note: some third-party components may not have fully integrated Joomla's ACL system. If ACL is important to your site, make sure you consider this when choosing the right component for your website.

Read 73929 times
Tagged under Administrators
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Hey Jen,
this is a very helpful article you created there. Thank you very much.
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Thanks! Glad you found it useful!
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Great article ! I've a question about ACL on category in the back-end. For a project, some writers must have access (read&write) to a "subcategory" but not to the parent category.

Could it be done natively with J!2.5 ? If yes, how ? It was possible with Joomla 1.5 and GMA Access.
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Yes, it's possible. Follow the instructions above, but set up ACL on the subcategory of interest. Leave the parent category set to the default settings (they can't read/write).

You could always make the subcategory into a category and set up ACL there as well, if the site structure will allow that.

If the subcategory exists simply for categorizing content, that should be possible.

If the subcategory is an important part of a category blog, it may not be possible to move it for ACL purposes.
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Thanks, Jen! I had always left those "Permissions" tabs alone, but now I know how to make my clients' lives easier by limiting the back end options to just the tasks they'll need to do.

I have a "stencil" Joomla installation that I keep up-to-date with all my favorite preferences and extensions, and I make a copy of that installation every time I create a new site. I'm going to set up a Client User Group just as you suggested, so I don't have to repeat these same steps over and over. :)
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Example ACL :

Categories :
News
-- Hot News (sub cat)

How to set ACL for the user that only can create/edit the article from sub category Hot News, but they can create/edit the News category

i have tried but still not get the point.

Thanks
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If I understand the question correctly, they should be able to create/edit Hot News but not News?

If that is the case, follow the instructions above for setting permissions on the Hot News category ONLY. Do not change permissions for News.

If they should be able to create/edit for News AND Hot News, set the permissions on the News category, and Hot News should inherit them.

Jen
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Brendan Mills Monday, 07 May 2012
Hello,

Thank you for the walk through, very well layout and explains what each step is for.

I have a question, I'm trying to allow the client to use JCE editor in the back end using the walk through you have provided above.
No matter what i do i can not get it to appear. Do you know how to allow the client to use JCE or any editor for that matter?

Thank you
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Brendan, JCE has its own permissions system which you can configure via Components - JCE (assuming JCE is installed on your Joomla site).

I cover some of that in my most recent "Joomla 2.5 Essential Training" video at lynda.com, if you need more assistance.

Jen
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Great article Jen... however I'd like to challenge you on the idea that "Joomla front end editing is limited".
I never let any user even KNOW there is a backend.

Joomla is more than capable of front end editing with a few simple enhancements.
JCE, and Front end article list component.
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Hi Norm -- well, until I'm able to easily

- create a new article in a category where I have permission
- link the article to the menu
- assign modules and template styles as required

I will still think of front-end editing as limited. :-)

We've made progress in some areas, but the ability to link articles to the menu is still absent.

thanks!
Jen
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Jen, most front end content administrators would not need to worry about modules.

That's not to say that you can't edit module content... I simply put an article into the module.

- create a new article in a category where I have permission = Simple and via core methods with 2.5
- link the article to the menu = Simple requires JCE free version.

Jen, I guess the main thing is that we as a community need to stop thinking about "What can Joomla do for web managers"... rather what can WE do for web managers.

Joomla back end admin, should never be shown to a content manager, they have no business there.

Happy to showcase any of my recent creations as examples at any time.
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Hi Jen,

This article would be helpful for a lot of Joomla users. Can we re-post it on our blog with a backlink? -> www.joomlashine.com/blog.html
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Huyen -- Joomla Magazine policy is that you may reprint the following on your blog:

Title
Author
Intro text
Link to full article

You should show no more than that.

Thanks!
Jen
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Kevin Anderson Monday, 14 May 2012
Jen,

Thank you for an article on back-end ACL.

I have walked through your example, and my "client" account cannot edit state in the Menu Manager, even though the Publish and Unpublish buttons are there. This is similar to some of the ACL difficulties I've encountered earlier, per our discussions at Joomla Day NE.

Do you encounter the same issue?

Thanks,
Kevin
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Hi Kevin, I did not encounter this issue, but there are many bugs still in ACL. I would report the bug on the Joomla Bug Tracker.

You can also try checking out Sander Potjer's ACL Manager at aclmanager.net -- this might give you another way to view ACL and permissions to see what's configured incorrectly. As I mentioned below, there's only several dozen clicks to this process -- it's easy to miss something along the way.

Jen
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Great article. I followed it to a tee, but then got hung up because I'm needing to make one particular custom html module within the Module Manager, only viewable/accessible by Super Users.

I have created an "Only Super" Access Level, and assigned "Super Users" to it, and then selected the module in question to be the "Only Super" access level, but my client--w/ a user group that's the child of public --can still see it.

Please help.

Stephanie H.
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Stephanie, hard to say without seeing the site. It sounds like you have things set up correctly but there are so many areas where problems can occur (there's dozens of little clicks that must happen) that it's easy to miss a step.

I'd try recreating the super user group, assign them the appropriate permissions, make a new super user login, make a new super user access level, and then make the module and assign it the access level. You should also check the your client's permissions to make sure they aren't included as part of the access level by mistake.

Jen
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Michael McCarthy Thursday, 17 May 2012
Jen,

Nice article! I am unable to reproduce the last screen shot in this article with out making the client user a Manager in addition to giving her/him membership to the Client User Group. Is this what you intended to do? Also the client user is not able to change the state of a menu item unless he/she has membership in the Manager. I have been unable to come up with a solution for the client to be able to change the state of a menu item without he/she being a member of the Manager Group.
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Hi Michael -- If you had to make the client a manager also, it's likely there's a permission not set somewhere along the way, so I'd review those permissions carefully to make sure they're all set appropriately.

Jen
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This is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you so much for this article.
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Jen, I think I messed something up. :(

I played around with some of the settings, and now when I go to mysite.com/administrator my admin page looks like your top pic. How do I fix it? I have access to phpmyadmin. I found somewhere that said to change the value of jos_modules - published to 1. I did, but it did not fix my problem. Can you be of any assistance?
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Hi Jen

Thanks for excellent tutorial, i'm setting this up in my default Joomla install

However i have a problem with point 1 "In Global Configuration, under Permissions..."

I set Admin Login permission to Allowed, however when i logged in as client i got a completely blank page. I went and set Access Administration Interface to Allowed, now i can see something similar to your first screen shot. Have things changed in 2.5.6 or am i missing something?

Roy

Using J2.5.6
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Roy and Ryan -- make sure you set the access level for these user groups to "special" so that you get the menus appearing on Joomla's back end.

If you see nothing but view site/logout, this is the solution that should fix your site. Even if no other permissions are assigned to the user group, if the access level is set to "special", you should see a screenshot like the second one under part 2.
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Can You tell me where and how to do it?
I read Your article but have no clue :(
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hello Madam,

thanks for the tutorial.

1) A nice additional feature for Joomla Media manager would be for a group's or user/s permission to be media folder specific.

For ex:
usergroup1 - allowed / denied for a specific folder
user1 - allowed / denied for a specific folder.

In a scenario whereby there are several contributors to a site, it will be nice, just to make sure a user uploads his/her media into the proper folder(his or her own media folder.)

2) Please advise: is there a workaround for a commercial component that doesnt have Joomla ACL integration? ACL is important to a site im working on, unfortunately the already purchased component has no "options"......

regards
Tokunbo
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Tokunbo,

Yes, I agree it would be nice to segment the media manager on a user group basis. JCE does this to some extent, if users upload and manage their images through that extension.

If a component does not have ACL integration, you could add it.
Sander Potjer discussed this at JAB 12.
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enter your message here...
how do i add extra group like manager in public back end
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Jen,

My client can edit articles on the front end, but I want him to also be able to add, delete, and edit user profiles, without seeing any of the other back end functions. Is this possible with the techniques you describe in this article? If so, can you offer any specifics on how to accomplish it?

If there is a way to manage other users' profiles from the front end, that would be even better.

Thanks!
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Excellent presntation of some difficult topics. Thanks. I found this seeking the answer to a related question. Maybe you know the answer (hopefully!). We're doing a new school site and all teachers and students have gmail/google apps accounts already. I was going to use OpenID to allow people to login using their google account. This would appear to bypass the Joomla and Joomla/K2 ACL process. I need to grant teachers and parents author and editing permissions. Should I stop looking for an OpenID solution and just start building up my ACL by hand? Using your article, I'm sure I can give them the permissions they need...but they have to be Joomla users first, right?

thanks!!
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Hi Jen
Great article on demystifying ACL. Can you tell me if you set up a client ACL per your article does the text editor show all the kitchen sink or is it limited.

Thanks
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Hi Jen,
A very useful article - thank you!
I have, what I would have thought to be, a very common problem:

I allow my admin user permission to edit articles from the front end. This enables clients to keep their content up to date themselves. However the big problem is that, whilst they can understand the WYSIWYG editor, they don't have an understanding of the "Publishing" options that are also capable of being edited in the front end:

Category:......... Now I don't want them to be able to change the Article Category as they are likely to get in a real pickle!

Published:...... Not so serious, but can lead to articles "disappearing"

Featured & Access:.... If these are changed they may have unexpected results for the uninitiated.

Is there any way to prevent the Publishing Options from being shown in the front end edit screen?

Thank you.

Steve
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Hi Jen,
Congratulations for your work. Yesterday I've see your Joomla 2.5 Essential Training Course.
I have 2 problems for solve and I appreciate if you can help me:
1 - I've create a Menu Item in my Main Menu - Login - Menu Item Type=Login Form. This Item is displayed by Login Form Module in a specific position. The problem is that I always have two modules displayed, independent of the position I choose. I've try to assign the Login Menu to a Single Article (Login) and insert the Login Module via loadposition. Because I was try center the Login Form, I've put the loadposition inside a tab, but I can't center that (JCE).
2 - The most important! I'm developing a site for a Restaurant of a friend, I just want that my friend can edit a single article in the Home Page (day specialty). I've try everything but I still can't see any option to edit the article in the front end.

Regards, sorry for my English (I'm Portuguese) and thank you.

Pedro
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Hi Pedro -- see if these articles help:

blog.helvecio.com/wpress/2012/08/05/joom...os-conceitos-de-acl/ -- ACL overview

magazine.joomla.org/issues/issue-feb-201...la-ACL-Access-Levels -- editing articles in the front end

magazine.joomla.org/issues/Issue-Mar-201...ferent-access-levels -- information on login boxes and configuration

Also, at lynda.com, I have a video which covers ACL, which might also help.

If none of those links help, send me a message through lynda.com tech support and I will help you. :-)
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Thanks for the helpful article.
May I just ask one question that have been bothering me for months.
How will I be able to remove the joomla logo in my back end so that my client wont be able to know/see that i created his site in joomla.And is it possible to let my client to make a menu to let the articles be assigned to it, in the front end without accessing the back end?This is my first project and I'm still a newbie in this field.with no computer background,just downloaded some of your tutorials and articles and followed them step by step and now I can create websites with your help and I'm so thankful for being a blessing.Hope and pray that you can still help me with my problem.Thank you so much.God bless you more and more people be blessed by you.
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Hi Jen --

The easiest way to remove the Joomla logo is just to create your own logo, call it the same thing as the old Joomla logo and make it the same size, and upload it to the right location.

your website URL/administrator/templates/bluestork/images/logo.png -- that's the location for a Bluestork admin template logo. It's 143x30 px in size.

Personally, I'm proud to create Joomla sites for my clients. It's a selling point. They aren't tied to my unique technology -- they can find other Joomla developers if they don't want to work with me anymore. And increasingly, that's important to clients who don't want to be tied to someone's proprietary technology.

You can't add items to Joomla's menu from the front end. However, you could reduce options in the back end so your client can only complete the tasks you allow (which is what was covered in this article).
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Hi Jen,
Thanks for you tips, i'm using it now at the moment. But i found serious issue as mention earlier regarding Menu Manager. As the user cannot edit state (published/unpublished) and trash a menu...

How do you solve this ?

PS: i'm looking at the ACL and found out that it looking for asset name.. com_menus.item.xxx (where xxx is menuID) instead of com_menus, the rules is not in #_assets table... could this be a problem ?
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Viktor, Joomla's database design is not my area of expertise, unfortunately.

There have been many bugs identified with ACL. The best place to ask this question is in forum.joomla.org or on the developer Google Groups listed at developer.joomla.org.

It definitely sounds like a bug, though.
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It would be great if you could modify the document to explain how to set to special isntead of a link... I finally realized that you are supposed to go INTO the special category and add your user group to special, not set your user group to special... a little confusing...

Thanks though, this is a huge help!
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An example of an extension that does not use ACL is roksprocket by rockettheme.com

This is an issue because this is actually one of the only modules I would give the client access to in order to modify slideshow images, text, and titles.

I have posted this issue on RT's forum.

Maybe someone knows a work around.
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when i have finished my editing work in articles and click on the 'view site' option on th joomla ..it does not give me output but it opens the home page of wampserver4 ..wat is the solution ..?
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You installed Joomla in a folder in WAMP and your link back to the home page goes to the root.

So Joomla lives in http://localhost/joomla

And your link is going to http://localhost

Jen
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In Back end,without assigning Special access level to the "Client User Group" we can't see any other cpanel,menu etc.

Is there any way to without assigning Special access level to the Client User for accessing particular option in back end process ?
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It is important to have full ACL control for back-end (administrator)
Sometime we have to delegate some function to junior staff or advanced client staff but only to some of the functionality. Most likely to extensions in particularly to modules but not only. e.g managing gallery form rockettheme.com And this part is missing and it is really needed for pro development and usage of Joomla CMS.
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i want display menu manager(control panel icon) on the joomla home page screen..can any one solve this issue..
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i want to display control panel menu manager icon on the home page of the joomla 2.5...pls can anyone provide the solution????
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Incredible step by step article. Exactly what I was looking for.

Thank you!!! Scott
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Hi mam,
I want to know how to create a back end database using xampp and mysql. please help me mam.
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Thanks for all of the tutorials Jen, they have all been very helpful! I have a question that I can't seem to find anywhere.

I need to walk my client thru from the very beginning, does he need to install wamp or mamp on his machine so that he can access phpadmin as I do? How does he access the login page?
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Hi Jen,

i have a question to the K2 ACL:

There is a K2 Group calls "Photo-Owner. The member of this K2 Group should edit and view own articles but they don´t see the articles from the other members of this group.

Have you a solution?

Jan
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Hello Jen,

thank you for your explanations, they are very clear.

I could setup multiple international users, allowing each one into its own blog category, and only this one.
I didn't think it was such a few steps away !
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Thank you so much for this. It's just what I needed.
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Hi Jen,
this is a very helpful article you created there, step by step, right to goal. Sometimes good example (just like this one) is everything you need. Thank you very, very much.
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THANK YOU! Well written and extremely helpful. This enabled me to do exactly what I needed- setting a user group that is only able to edit or add to one category without having access to anything else.
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Thanks Jen!

I have a question and a couple of issues.

First the question:
Is it possible to limit a group to a specific sub-folder of the Media folder for uploads?

The issues:
I've followed all the steps up to assigning the Menu permissions, but when I logout as the group user and login back in, I'm not seeing any of the Media or Menu buttons as illustrated in the photo in section 3d above.

My text input window is not showing the wysiwyg menu.

Could this issues be a conflict with the JCE Editor?
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answered one of my issues ... enabling the group in JCE Administration :: Edit Profile / Setup allowed the wysiwyg menu to display to the group
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THANK YOU VERY MUCH for wonderful tutorial.

I would like to know how to create similar arrangement pertaining to specific modules and plugins. This comes handy when you have admin for particular extensions.

Regards,
Amir.
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Hi Jen,
thank you for your post it is awesomely well explained.
I still have a problem while setting up rights in my backend.
Here is the scenario (working with j2.5):
I have 2 categories under my news :

News
- cat 1
- cat 2

I created a user group : "author cat 1" and "author cat 2" with author as parent. Those groups have "special" level access

I would like "auth cat 1" to be able to write an article into "cat 1" and only "cat 1" and "auth cat 2" to write only in "cat 2" and this from the backend.

To achieve this, here is how I configured my ACL :
- In global conf I authorized
- Site connection
- backend connection

- In article manager I authorized
- Access admin interface

- In "Cat 1" I authorized "Auth cat 1" to
- create
- edit own

- In "Cat 2" I authorized "Auth cat 2" to
- create
- edit own


With those settings I can log in to the backend, go to article manager but when I try to create an article, an error occurs with the text : "Edit not permitted"

the only way to make it possible to create an article is by adding create and edit own in global conf for both groups.

and even by doing this, when i have the article form, the category list is empty so i can't submit the form.

Have you got an idea in order to help me solve this normaly easy config?

Thank you!
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Thanks for the informative article. My query is suppose I am using Acymailing (email marketing) component and want to give the client access to statistics (in fact, all actions related with this component only, such as sending newsletters). Is it possible?
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